Bounce Back!

I recently had a major disappointment.  I’d been working on a project for nearly three years.  Having spent lots of time, energy, and money on this endeavor, I was ready to reap the fruits of my labors.  The final assignment was to pass a very rigorous test.  I did not pass.

I was devastated.  I’m used to succeeding.  I couldn’t wrap my head around it.

I was mad.

I cried.

I swore (sorry Mom).

I screamed about my perceived injustice.

I crumbled.

Then I sat back and asked myself “what’s next?”  How was I going to bounce back?

As a coach, I encounter this type of situation with my clients on a frequent basis.  I worked with my personal coach (yes, even coaches use coaches) to help process the situation and determine my next steps.

Embrace the emotion:  I’m a very emotional person.  I feel deeply.  This rocked me to the core and I knew I needed to acknowledge the disappointment.  So, I let myself have 24 hours to process all the negative emotions, then I stopped feeling sorry for myself and started figuring out what my next step was.  Years ago I remember my coaching mentor saying “there is motivation in emotion.”  Yes, yes, there is!

Own it:  I had a very clarifying conversation with my mentor.  She gave me some incredible insight into where I’d gone wrong; how I could learn from this disappointment; and what I could do differently to prepare for my next opportunity.  How often do we look at our ownership in things that don’t go the way we want them to?

Put it in perspective:  At first, I wanted to completely throw in the towel, but deep-down I knew that would only be a further disappointment.  I literally said to myself “why even try again?”  Honestly!  Even though I’d spent nearly three years working on this project, it is not a one-and-done opportunity.  It’s a process.  It’s a learning and character-building opportunity.  In the scheme of things, this is a little bump in the road.

Learn from others and work harder:  When I really thought about it, I realized I’d not put the effort into the test that I should have.  I’m generally pretty successful at things and hadn’t really acknowledged the effort being successful in this endeavor was going to take.  Fortunately, I have several colleagues that have been through this process.  I asked each and every one of them what they did to be successful and have incorporated their processes into my new learnings.  In a nutshell, I’ve learned both from my mistakes and the successes of others.  And, frankly, I’m just plain working harder this time around.

The silver lining in this process is that I’ve become a stronger, smarter, and more resilient person than I was before this experience.

What can you learn from the disappointments, large or small, that you encounter?  How do you bounce back?

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

 

 

National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

What does “self improvement” mean to you?

September is “National Self Improvement” month.   Although most of us are constantly striving to improve ourselves, sometimes we just need a gentle nudge or reminder to help move us forward to living the life we want to live.

Here are some areas my clients frequently mention when they are focusing on self-improvement and self-care:

Get some sleep: We all feel better after a good nights’ sleep, right?  Well, what else does it do for us other than make us feel good?

  • Saves calories: Well-rested people eat an average of close to 300 calories per day.
  • Makes your brain more efficient at recall: When we sleep, our brain sorts through all the information it took in for the day, making it easier to recall the important stuff.
  • Heals you from the inside out: While sleeping, our brain triggers the release of hormones that encourage tissue growth.

Forgive someone, possibly yourself:  I find forgiveness to be a learned skill that I’m constantly working on.  I know that harboring resentment does more damage to my personal well-being than the actual indiscretion.  According to Dr. Judith Orloff  “Forgiveness does more for you than anyone else because it liberates you from negativity and lets you move forward.”  Whom do you need to forgive to move forward?

Create silence for 10 minutes a day:  Think about it: how many waking minutes do you spend in silence each day?  We get up and turn on the TV or radio while we get ready. We get in the car and turn on the radio.  During the day we are on the phone, listening to piped-in music, having meetings, etc.  Then, we get back in our cars and listen to the radio, and come home and turn on the TV.  Very little of our day is in silence.  In 2011 the World Health Organization published a report concluding that “there is overwhelming evidence that exposure to environmental noise has adverse effects on the health of the population.”  Silence helps our brains relax.

Get physical:  Make an effort to move a little every day.  Even just a little bit pays off.  I’ve written a previous blog about this and I know it’s more difficult for some to schedule than others (I’m in awe of all you working moms and dads!), but the benefits of even a few minutes every day pays off both physically and emotionally.

Get social: Social connections and overall happiness go hand-in-hand.  Ed Diener and Martin Seligman, two pioneers of positive psychology, conducted a study in 2002 at the University of Illinois.  The results showed that the most common characteristic of students who were very happy and showed the fewest signs of depression were “their strong ties to friends and family and commitment to spending time with them.”

What would you like to work on during “National Self Improvement Month?”

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

The Power of Predictability

Seasons change.

Winter turns to Spring.

Spring turns to Summer.

Summer turns to Fall.

Fall turns to Winter.

We know it’s happening.  We have a pretty good idea what to expect.  We can prepare for it.

It’s predictable.

For you Myers Briggs types, I’m an ESTJ — Extrovert, Sensing, Thinking, Judging (but not in a bad way).  I’m practical, hardworking, structured, organized, dependable, and predictable.

Ask anyone that knows me.

  • If I say I’ll do it.  I do it.
  • If I say I’ll be there at 5:00, I’ll be there at 5:00.  Not 4:45 or 5:15.  5:00.
  • I pretty much wear the same style of clothes every day . . . . practical and not too flamboyant.
  • Give the opportunity, red wine vs a mojito.  🙂

I’m predictable and most of the people that I surround myself with appreciate it.  They know what to expect from me.  They know they can depend on me. They know what I value. I don’t live on the edge.  A relationship with me is pretty safe (possibly a little less exciting, but safe).

What happens when we are unpredictable in our personal or professional lives?

  • People stop trusting our word.
  • Our team members spend an inordinate amount of time processing “what if” scenarios in their heads.
  • Opportunities may pass us by because people aren’t comfortable that we will hold up our end of the bargain.
  • We stop getting invited to things because we may show up late (or not at all), say insensitive things or dress in appropriately.

How predictable are you?

How is your level of predictability helping or hurting your relationships?

 

 

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

“I really thought you’d be more upset.”

A week or so ago my husband and I went to a BBQ/pool party.  I really didn’t have any intention to swim, so I didn’t wear a swimming suit, just normal backyard BBQ attire.  As it turned out, having a suit on would have been handy when I dropped my iPhone in the pool!

As you might imagine, it took me a minute to figure out what my next step was.  Long story short, it took about five minutes for someone to fish my phone out of the pool.  I was super-excited when the phone appeared to still be working . . . . and super-disappointed two minutes later when it stopped working.  Immediately the phone went into a bag of rice and fingers were crossed that it would all be fine the next day.  Well, the phone wasn’t fine, but surprisingly, I wasn’t very upset.

As we were driving home, my husband looked at me quizzically and said “I really thought you’d be more upset.”  Then I got to thinking . . . . I’m surprised I’m not more upset too.  Then it hit me.

Remember my  last post when I talked a little bit about meditation and how it changes the brain?  Below is a quick synopsis of a 2016 study on mindfulness and emotional regulation:

Simply put, the authors argued that individuals who are naturally mindful can effectively regulate their emotions even without meditation, but for those who are not naturally mindful, simply forcing oneself to be mindful “in the moment” is not enough — it is necessary to engage in mindfulness meditation in order to effectively regulate your emotions.

I’m generally a pretty emotional person.  A couple of years ago I would have been so upset about the phone issue, I would have started berating myself with negative self-talk about my irresponsibility . . . right after I stopped crying about it.  But my regular practice of mindful meditation kept those emotions in check.

Here’s how I see meditation making a positive impact on my life:

In the moment:  I have a quick meditation if I need to destress in the moment.  Closing my eyes and taking a few deep breaths I repeat “Stillness of mind, awareness of body.”  This will reduce my heart rate and give me a moment of pause.

Daily:  I meditate about 10 minutes almost every day.  It sets my intention and starts my day in a calm place.

Cumulative:  My blood pressure is low and my emotions are much more regulated.  This serves me well in almost every situation.

So what did I learn?

  • Mindful meditation works.
  • Be more careful with my phone.
  • If the phone goes swimming again, put it in a small plastic bag BEFORE you put it in rice. (The nice folks at the Apple store had to dig three pieces of rice out of the power port.)  🙂

What positive impact could mindfulness have on your life?

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

Member Color - Web
National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

Start your day right!

This video resurfaced on my Facebook feed this week.  The topic of the video is 10 life lessons from basic SEAL training, delivered by Admiral William H. McRaven.  What I loved about this video is life lesson #1 . . . . start your day off by making your bed.

Will making your bed really set your entire day off on the right foot? Why will making your bed set your day off on the right foot?  It’s a success.  It’s a completion.  It’s motivating.  It feels good to start the day with things in order.

When I’m working with my organizing and coaching clients, I encourage them to start the day with something that will make them feel good, accomplished, and motivated to take on the world . . .  or possibly just cleaning the house.

What else do I encourage to help my clients start their day off with energy?

  1. Start the night before.   Planning the next day the night before can be very helpful in getting the morning started right.  Look at your calendar and see what’s ahead of you.  Put out the clothes you plan to wear.   Make a list of the three most important items on your “to do” list.  If possible, pack lunches.  Whatever you can do the night before will help keep your busy morning on track.
  2. Take some time to meditate.  Before I started meditating, I had this vision of sitting on the floor, cross-legged, in total silence, with incense burning in the background.  Well, that just sounded like too much work for me.  So I started small, and have stayed there.  I meditate four to five times a week for 10 minutes.  I’m not a neuroscientist so I can’t explain how it works, but meditating physically changes the brain.
  3. Get dressed and put on your shoes.  Yup, just the simple act of getting dressed and putting on your shoes tells your brain it’s ready to take on the day.  Personally, there’s a big difference in my ability to motivate myself if I’m in “go out in public” clothes vs “hangin’ out and having another cup of coffee” clothes.  How about you?
  4. Get a little exercise.  I know we all don’t have time to hit the gym for an hour first thing in the morning, but most of us have time for a brisk 15-20 minute walk.  (Well, those of you that have little ones at home probably don’t, but you get lots of exercise chasing after them, right?) If you can’t fit in 15-20 minutes, take 30 seconds to do some stretching.  Even that small amount of time is enough to wake your body up.
  5. Eat something.  Again, most of us choose not to get up early enough to have a sit-down breakfast.  But that doesn’t mean we can’t eat something healthy, even if we are on-the-go.  My morning staple is oatmeal cupcakes.  The recipe I use makes 24 cupcakes and only takes about 40 minutes (the recipe says 25, but I’m clearly not that fast).  I freeze them and 1:00 in the microwave later, I’m out the door!

What do you do to ensure your mornings start off on the right foot?

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

Member Color - Web
National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

 

 

Back To School Prep

We’ve had quite the beautiful summer here in the Puget Sound area, but the recent addition of back-to-school commercials reminds me that summer is coming to an end.

Side note:  I do not have any preferences about where to shop, but I have to say the Walmart Super Hero commercial makes me smile every time I see it.

Although I don’t have any children in the back-to-school range, some of my clients do.  I’ve experienced, through them, how getting everyone ready to head back into the classroom adds an extra layer of anxiety and stress to the last few lazy days of summer.    Here are some tips to get you started and make the transition a little smoother.

School Supplies:

    1. Get a copy of the school’s supply list.  I was able to find the school supply list for my local middle school on-line within just 30 seconds.  Doing a web search should result in a list similar to this (I searched “Lake Stevens School supply list”).  I also found a well-organized file of school supply lists at my local Staples, so check with your local retailers.
    2. Once you have the list, shop at home.  Chances are, you will have a good number of the supplies already on hand.  There’s no need to purchase a full set of supplies every year.
    3. If you have supplies you aren’t using (or don’t foresee using in the near future), donate them to a school or to a local Boys and Girls Club.  I’m certain they will be put to better use than taking up space in your home.
  1. Clothes:
    1. Check with your school to see if there are dress codes that need to be followed. If so, ensure that you and your student reads and understands them prior to embarking on the clothes shopping adventure.  I can’t imagine much more frustrating than finding out your son/daughter have clothes they love, but can’t wear to school.
    2. Depending on the age of your student, you will more than likely need to go shopping with them.   Note I said “with them.”  Although it may be simpler to just do the shopping on your own, having your child with you may be more efficient.  If you shop with your child, you will ensure the clothes fit properly, they feel good in them, and are something they like and will wear.  So many of my clients spend inordinate amounts of time shopping/returning/shopping/returning.  The added stress and time generally isn’t worth it.
  2. Classes:  Hopefully at this point, classes have been signed up for.  If not, get in touch with the school to set an appointment to register as soon as possible.
  3. Extra-curricular activities:  Have all extra-curricular activities been signed up for?  Has the appropriate equipment been arranged for?  If not, now’s the time to start working through that process.
  4. Transportation:  Most of my clients work at least part-time out of the home, so arranging transportation for any after-school activities is critical.
  5. Health requirements:  Does the school require specific health tests or immunizations?  Again, a quick on-line search led to this information for our local school district.
  6. Daily schedules:  Because our student’s days are generally less structured during the summer, some habits may have developed that need to be changed in order to be successful when school starts.  Now’s the time to start adjusting to getting up earlier, scheduling study time, and creating a new routine for getting to bed on time.

Changes in schedules tend to add a little stress to our lives, but some excellent pre-planning goes a long way to making the transition just a little easier!

Simplify your life!

This is “National Simplify Your Life” week.

Because it’s part of my business name (Organize to Simplify) I’m constantly thinking about what “simplify” means to me, my friends, my family, and my clients.

Here are some things that may need to be simplified in our lives:

  • Stuff?  Yes!
  • Schedules?  Yes!
  • Technology? Yes!
  • People?  Yes!  (yikes!)

Stuff:

Most of us have way more stuff than we need (and probably even want).  Look around the room you are sitting in and really take a hard look at everything that surrounds you.  Do you use them?  Do they bring you joy and happiness?  If not, what would it feel like to let them go?  How would it feel knowing that they were in the home of someone that actually needed and wanted them? Not only is it okay to let things go, de-cluttering makes us healthier:

According to the Chicago Tribune: “Getting rid of clutter can have unexpected health benefits. Letting go of material things gives a feeling of euphoria some liken to the runner’s high. It’s liberating and frees up time and space for healthy habits, such as exercising. It can even reduce allergy symptoms and help you lose weight.”

Schedules:

Raise your hand if you feel you have too much to do and not enough time (I can almost see all of your hands raised right now).  Do you need to do everything on your schedule?   Are there things you knew at the time you should have said “no, but thanks for asking” to?  Are you doing things that don’t make you happy and are not critical (book club you no longer enjoy, exercise class you are only attending because you already paid for it but don’t really like, networking meetings that don’t bring you joy or clients, etc.)  Much like our stuff, cluttered and over-crowded schedules can affect our health.  I encourage you to take a look at your schedule and see what you can eliminate.  What would you do with that extra time?  Exercise?  Sleep? Spend more time with family and friends?

Technology:

Am I actually suggesting you give up technology?  Absolutely not!!! What I am suggesting is taking a critical look at how much time you are devoting to it.  Personally, I don’t do Twitter, Instagram, or Tumblr,  but I spend way too much time on Facebook.  What are you learning from all these connections?  Is it really a “connection” or just a way to spend time?  What would happen if you disconnected from a social media platform or two?  What would happen if you reduced the amount of time you spent on them?  What would you do with that time?  Remember, doing nothing is a perfectly acceptable answer to that question.

People:

This one may sound harsh, but it’s worth thinking about.  I could never do without connections to people.  I love being around people; being with people fills me with joy.  But, are there connections I am spending time maintaining that no longer serve me (or the other person) the way they used to?  Think about it.  Is the time spent maintaining a relationship disproportionate to the joy the relationship brings you?

Some people come into your life just to teach you how to let go.”   Search Quotes

I’m pretty sure we are all aware of things that could be eliminated from our lives, but it’s so hard to take that first step.  So, I’m going to challenge you:

Over the next week:

  • Eliminate one item of clutter.
  • Cancel one unnecessary appointment.
  • Reduce time spent on technology by one hour.
  • Take a critical look at one relationship.

Simplify your life . . . one small step at a time.

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

Member Color - Web
National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

Are you ready for a trip to the hospital?

Unfortunately, my husband and I had to make an unexpected trip to the hospital recently.  As to be expected when leaving the house under those circumstances, we were not thinking clearly.   Because we assumed we were coming back home within a few hours, we were woefully unprepared for an overnight stay.  Fortunately for us, we have an amazing support structure that stepped in to help, which further clarified how important home organization is, especially when we were not at home.

The launching pad:  Fortunately, my husband and I always put our wallet/handbag and keys in the same place every day.  I refer to this as our daily launching pad area.  Everything you need to take with you when you leave the house should be in this area.  Knowing where his launching pad was kept me from having to run around the house trying to find his wallet to ensure I had his driver’s license and insurance information.

Clothing:  Once it became apparent we were staying for a while, our friends offered to grab some clothes and bring them to the hospital.  Although we didn’t need to have them bring any clothing, having an organized wardrobe system would have allowed me to tell them exactly where everything was that we needed . . . socks in the upper right drawer, t-shirts in the middle right drawer, jeans hanging on the left side of the closet third hanger in, etc.

Personal items:  Again, because we have a system, I would have been able to let our friends know exactly where to find the travel toothbrush/toothpaste kit; my contact care kit; makeup remover pads; etc.  All things we would have needed if our stay had been extended past 24 hours.

Accessories: One of the most important things we can do in these situations is to stay in contact with our loved ones.  I didn’t have the foresight to bring a phone/iPad charger with me when I left the house, so having them bring chargers was a necessary.  It was nice to be able to say “The chargers are in the kitchen, center plug.  Please bring the 4-plug charger, two small Apple chargers, and the one large Apple charger.”  Because things were actually where they were supposed to be, it was much easier for our friends to help us out.

I hope to not have to do this again, but I feel better knowing the effort we put into organizing our home made it much easier for people to help us.

How would your current state of home organization work in a crisis?

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

Member Color - Web
National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

How’s your cell phone courtesy?

Smartphones have become a necessity in our lives these days.  No matter where we look, people are texting, emailing, calling, dictating, taking photos, etc.  So much so, that we sometimes lose connection with the people sitting right next to us.

Since July is National Cell Phone Courtesy Month, I thought it was the perfect time to give some thought to:

  • Who uses mobile devices?
  • How do we use our mobile devices?
  • How can we be more courteous when we do use our mobile devices?

From a 2016 Pew Research study:

% of U.S. adults who own cell phones:

Any cellphone Smartphone Cellphone, but not smartphone
Total 95% 77% 18%
Men 96% 78% 18%
Women 94% 75% 19%

How do we use our smartphones?

From a 2016 Statistic Brain survey of mobile device users:

Percent who said their mobile phone is the first and last thing they look at each day 29 %
Percent who said they need to have the latest mobile technology 18 %
Percent who check their mobile device every 30 minutes or less 37 %
Percent who said they could only go a few hours without their mobile phone 34 %
Percent who said they prefer to communicate by text message 32 %
Percent who have asked someone on a date via text 20 %
Percent who say their mobile device make them better parents 65 %
Percent who would take their mobile device to work over their lunch 66 %

Anyone else shocked by these number?  I sure was.

Which leads me to, how can we be more courteous when using our mobile devices?

Put your device away.

I don’t know of anyone that appreciates having a meeting or meal with someone who chooses to leave their mobile device on the table.  It sends a pretty clear message that the phone is as, or more, important than the person sitting right in front of us.

And remember, unless you are an emergency service provider, it’s probably okay to let a call go to voicemail or look at a text when you are not engaged with another person.  (Caveat:  I will sometimes keep my phone out if the person I’m meeting is late and may need to get in touch for directions; I may pull my phone out if someone has specifically asked to have something looked up, or a photo or contact shared; etc.)

Keep it quiet and calm.

Whenever possible, keep your phone on vibrate mode.  If you need to take an emergency call, politely excuse yourself and take the call in a private area.  Also, remember your voice and gestures travel.  Even if you think you are out of sight or earshot, you probably aren’t.

Follow the law and “house” rules:

Many localities have very stringent and specific laws pertaining to using smart phones while operating a motor vehicle, even when stopped at a light or stop sign (Washington is enforcing much more strict laws starting on July 23rd).  If you absolutely need to check your phone, find a safe place to pull over.

Some places (hospitals, airplanes, courtrooms, libraries, movie theatres, etc.) request no cell phone use as not to disturb others.  Follow the rules for wherever you are, they are there for a reason.

Don’t use you cellphones as a social blocker:

I get it, sometimes we just don’t know what to do with ourselves.  We’ve all been in new or awkward situations where we don’t’ want to feel “alone.”  Picking up our cellphone allows us to “connect,” but not with the people we are surrounded by.  Looking at our phones sends a clear message of “don’t bother me, I’m busy.” Put your phone down, take a deep breath and engage face-to-face with those around you.

Watch where you are going.

Twice yesterday I had people nearly walk into me in the grocery store.  I came to a complete stop in order to avoid someone who was distracted by their phone from running into me. Imagine if those same people were on a busy sidewalk or crossing a busy street. “Don’t text and walk” is becoming as important as “Don’t drink and drive.”

Cell phones are part of our lives . . . let’s all use them responsibly.  🙂

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

Member Color - Web
National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
ICD_LogoTag_Horz_72 website
Institute for Challenging Disorganization:
Level I Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization; ADD; Client Administration; Time Management; Mental Health; and Hoarding.
Level II Specialist Certificates earned in Chronic Disorganization and ADHD.
Coach Approach for Organizers
Graduate of the Comprehensive Training Program: Coaching Essentials; Strengths-Based Coaching; Brain-Based Coaching; Life and ADHD Coaching; and Organizer Coach Integration
Graduate-level training: Body-Based Coaching; ADHD Coaching Competencies

Every Day Is A New Start

I like to think of myself as a decent golfer.  Not a great golfer, but a decent golfer.  Because I spend a fair amount of time doing it, I frequently use golfing as a metaphor for a lot of life’s little challenges that get thrown my way.

For example:

Skills vs expectationsA golf “index” gives a benchmark of your skill set which helps manage expectations when you are out on the course.  How honest are we about our skill level and how fairly do we manage our expectations based on those skills?

Practice makes you . . . . better, not perfect:  If you watch any professional golf, you will see that even professionals, who practice for hours and hours every day, sometimes hit horrible shots.  It is unreasonable to have an expectation that we will do everything perfectly every time.

Honesty is paramount: Golf is referred to as “the gentleman’s game.”  One of the biggest tenants of the game is that golfers call penalties on themselves should an infraction occur.  This is just as important in life as it is on the golf course.  If you do something wrong, admit it, correct it, and move on.

Don’t give up.  What I find funny about golf (and frankly very frustrating) is that I can golf really well one day, and horribly the next . . . at the very same course under the very same conditions.  Why is that?  I didn’t forget how to golf; the course didn’t change; I didn’t change my equipment.  Just one day I could do it, the next day I couldn’t.  But, for whatever crazy reason, I will try it all over again the very next day.  I won’t give up.

Which leads me to my point on handling life’s little challenges:

  • Manage your expectations.
  • Practice, but be reasonable.
  • Be honest.
  • Don’t give up.

And remember, every day is a new start.

Cindy Jobs

www.organizetosimplify.com

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National Association of Professional Organizers, Seattle Chapter Vice President
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